Page 1 of 1

Nalbinding

Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 8:39 pm
by Jim Smith
[url]Any evidence for this in C15 England.? Any evidence either way gratefully accepted.[/url]

Re: Nalbinding

Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 8:53 pm
by sally
I have a feeling that the only confirmed piece of nalbinding in England is the Coppergate sock, which is 10thC and possibly an import. Its certainly not a common technique in Britain by the 15thC

Re: Nalbinding

Posted: Mon Apr 09, 2012 9:58 pm
by Jim Smith
Thought so Sally, but I reckoned I'd better check to make sure I hadn't missed something obvious. Thanks :D

Re: Nalbinding

Posted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 8:10 am
by FionaDowson
That really begs the question of how old knitting is.
The usual argument is that knitting superseded nalbinding because it's quicker.
I have read that there is evidence of knitting in Ancient Egypt but have yet to find a reference for this, or a definition of what constitutes knitting. If an archeologist found a piece of nalbinding they could well say, that's knitting, my nan used to do that.
My understanding of nalbinding is that it's still practiced in remote places like Iceland.
Certainly there's no evidence of crochet being more than C18 but Tunisian crochet/shepherd's knitting may well be older.
It's not like anyone went around interviewing shepherd's on windy hillsides to find out what they were doing is it?

Re: Nalbinding

Posted: Tue Dec 03, 2013 11:37 am
by Midland Spinner
FionaDowson wrote: If an archeologist found a piece of nalbinding they could well say, that's knitting,
There have been a lot of pieces of fabric mis-identified over the years - that's one of the reasons why the history of knitting is shrouded in doubt & misinformation.

But Knitting and nalbinding are Topologically completely different. Most definitions of knitting say something along the lines of "a technique for making a piece of fabric by looping BIGHTS of a CONTINUOUS piece of yarn through itself using sticks or pins. The fabric is not a knot, rather a series of interlaced loops." (*OK, it becomes a knot the minute that you pass the end of the final stitch through itself as you cast off, but a fragment of knitting is not a knot.)

Whereas Nalbinding is "a Technique of making a piece of fabric by knotting SHORT PIECES of yarn through itself, splicing in new lengths of yarn as necessary." So a fragment of Nalbinding is a series of knots.

Knitting and nalbinding do look superficially alike to the the uneducated eye. But it would be indefensible to just look at a piece of archaeological fabric and say "hmm that looks like what my Gran used to make, so I'll call it knitting" without calling in an expert in non-woven fabrics. You wouldn't say "oh look there's a potsherd, it looks a bit like what Jim the Pot makes, so I'll attribute it to C15th" without calling in an expert. Especially as we now have so many non-invasive methods of looking at the structure inside finds without destroying them.