bizarre weapons and armor

Moderator: Moderators

lucasbu
Posts: 30
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 2:20 am
Location: London

Postby lucasbu » Thu Sep 03, 2009 3:27 pm

Medicus Matt wrote:The first one is a La Tene style Iron Age sword, so that's 2nd-1st century BC.

The second one is a spanish falcata so again that's Iron Age.

The fourth one is a Bronze Age sword, about 1000BC?

So, whilst they certainly fit the description "Not common on a 15th century battlefield" I think that using 2500-1700 year old antiques might be pushing the boundaries a little too far?


i know, i just posted the image. it's what google came with when i searched for Kilij



User avatar
narvek
Posts: 456
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:55 am
Location: Prague, Czech Rep.
Contact:

Postby narvek » Thu Sep 03, 2009 11:23 pm

Before your next post read this: http://livinghistory.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?t=18540

then read it again aloud to make sure you understand it. A pak přestan vymýšlet píčoviny.

:P


Eurototty reporting in for duty!

User avatar
Medicus Matt
Post Knight
Posts: 1470
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:16 pm
Location: Zummerzet
Contact:

Postby Medicus Matt » Fri Sep 04, 2009 10:19 am

lucasbu wrote:
i know, i just posted the image. it's what google came with when i searched for Kilij


None of the swords in that picture is a kilij.
If you know that as well then I don't see the point of you posting it.


"I never said that I was here to help."

User avatar
WorkMonkey
Posts: 396
Joined: Sat Oct 15, 2005 1:00 pm
Location: Buuuuurmingum
Contact:

Postby WorkMonkey » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:52 pm

There is no point to this entire thread, other than to wind me, and many others, up.


WORKMONKEY: The Wilderness Years.
Image
Look at the monkey, funny monkey
Little red monkey, acting so fidgety

User avatar
Fox
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2652
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 12:27 pm
Location: Cheshire

Postby Fox » Fri Sep 04, 2009 2:03 pm

Marcus Woodhouse wrote:The bardische is one of those weapons that is more popular among re-enactors then density should allow. My own research points to it being reasonably common (in illustartions-not finds) throughout Europe in the middle of the 14th century and then it reappears almost solely in Northern and eartern europe at the end of the 15th century, however its second appearence seems to show it more as a low status weapon (often dipicted by men carrying spears as well).

All so true.
In my defence, I'd never seen one before I bought it, that's how uncommon they were.
If my undeserved reputation with the weapon has been even partly responsible for it's spread, I appologise.
There still aren't that many out there.

I recall (and this was nearly ten years ago, so I couldn't tell you where, or how) that I provinanced a bardiche to England in the 14thC. That evidence might, or might not, reach my higher standard of proof now.

Certainly they were more common in Eastern Europe early in the 15thC, and those were mostly also "commoners" weapons.

Finds, and I think the two in a case above show one of each, range from unbalanced, rustic axes to better made, balanced weapons.



User avatar
Dave B
Post Knight
Posts: 1737
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 9:34 pm
Location: Cheshire
Contact:

Postby Dave B » Fri Sep 04, 2009 3:02 pm

Fox wrote:I recall (and this was nearly ten years ago, so I couldn't tell you where, or how) that I provinanced a bardiche to England in the 14thC. That evidence might, or might not, reach my higher standard of proof now.


When I disucssed it with him, Roger Lankford (sp) had two sources, an illustration and some sort of carving. IIRC the illustration was high status, a knight of some sort.


Find time in every day to look at your life and say; 'Well, it could be worse'

Kurt's uncle Bob.

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Fri Sep 04, 2009 8:00 pm

It is and he seems to be using it one handed!


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

Nigel
Post Knight
Posts: 1676
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 7:45 am
Location: Pontefract
Contact:

Postby Nigel » Sun Sep 06, 2009 7:08 pm

WorkMonkey wrote:There is no point to this entire thread, other than to wind me, and many others, up.


want me to be nice to him ?


There’s a country in Europe where they treat their ex soldiers with pride no waits for medical treatment after injuries received during service, no amensia from the government. Cant for the life of me recall where it is but I know exactly where it is not.

User avatar
Grymm
Post Centurion
Posts: 594
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2005 9:18 pm
Location: The Chilterns

Postby Grymm » Tue Sep 08, 2009 9:22 pm

Daft 16thC weapons now
The gurt big lump o'wood
Image
The agricultural scythe
Image
Sickle (not like the one in The Hair Bear Bunch)
Image
BDSM with a footmans flail
Image
And a post combat cuddle
Image
Last edited by Grymm on Wed Sep 09, 2009 1:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.


Futuaris nisi irrisus ridebis.

User avatar
Phil the Grips
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2000
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 2:01 pm
Location: Auld Reekie- capital village o' Jockland
Contact:

Postby Phil the Grips » Tue Sep 08, 2009 11:13 pm



--Angels also carry weapons--
http://www.blackboarswordsmanship.co.uk/

User avatar
stephen wootten
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 9:20 pm

Postby stephen wootten » Wed Sep 09, 2009 12:23 am

id say a machette or a reed knife


cuius testiculos habes, habeas cardia et cerebellum

A Bayard, A Bayard!!!!!

guthries Sardukarr Bashar

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Sep 09, 2009 9:04 am

Was the big log of wood only invented in the 16th century?
I'm trying to provedence it for 15th century use.


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

User avatar
Grymm
Post Centurion
Posts: 594
Joined: Fri Aug 05, 2005 9:18 pm
Location: The Chilterns

Postby Grymm » Wed Sep 09, 2009 9:18 am

Marcus Woodhouse wrote:Was the big log of wood only invented in the 16th century?
I'm trying to provedence it for 15th century use.


Nah Def 16thC and German not used in Britain 'til 1625.


Futuaris nisi irrisus ridebis.

User avatar
Colin Middleton
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2037
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 12:31 pm
Location: Sheffield
Contact:

Postby Colin Middleton » Wed Sep 09, 2009 12:29 pm

While the 'big lump of wood' was known of well before 1500, it was not until the 'enlightenment' of the renaisance saw all intelligence concentrated in the hands (heads?) of an elite few that the general public at large became SO stupid as to regard the 'big lump of wood' as a viable weapon. During the Middle Ages, most people had the good common sense to use far more effective weapons and keep the big lump of wood for more important purposes, like burning.

:wink:


Colin

"May 'Blood, blood, blood' be your motto!"

Image

User avatar
paul bennett
Posts: 270
Joined: Sat Mar 29, 2008 7:56 pm
Location: Manchester
Contact:

Postby paul bennett » Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:38 pm

Grymm wrote:Daft 16thC weapons now
The gurt big lump o'wood
Image
The agricultural scythe
Image
Sickle (not like the one in The Hair Bear Bunch)
Image
BDSM with a footmans flail
Image
And a post combat cuddle
Image


Dreynshlag did a fantastic demo of scythe fighting a few years ago, dramatized as Paulus Hector Mair (author of those fechtbuchs) vs Death.
The whole thing was sub-titled by people with large sheets of paper with the script written on them


http://www.historicarts.co.uk
Bespoke and off-the-shelf furniture, games and weaponry for living history

User avatar
behanner
Posts: 201
Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2005 8:39 am

Postby behanner » Thu Sep 10, 2009 3:19 am

[quote="Black Pear"]
The most exotic I would go with is a Goedendaag. Been to the continent, met some Flemish troops, brought a pointy pickaxe handle home. Enough said.[quote]

I'll one better you on this one.
Inventory of War Materials at Calais 1481.
In godon dawghes with pikes of iron ix



Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Thu Sep 10, 2009 8:22 am

So no lumps of wood.
:(
I'll have to carry on using a longsword and pollaxe then.
:D


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!


Return to “1100-1500”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests