History of the Kettle

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pigsxyz
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History of the Kettle

Postby pigsxyz » Fri Jun 06, 2008 5:23 pm

When we do gigs I see lots of people with blackened kettles. Are these appropriate for 15thc? I would much prefer to use one of these but have been told to find evidence of authenticity before I can put mine to use.

Anyone knowing the answer would be appreciated.

cheers Ann



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Postby guthrie » Fri Jun 06, 2008 6:38 pm

Moved to the appropriate forum where it will get some attention.



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Postby Cathryne » Fri Jun 06, 2008 7:06 pm

Ketill (Old Norse), ketel (Middle English) = kettle. The word kettle derives from the Latin "catillus" a diminutive of "catinus" or "large bowl." It appears in Old English as "cetel" and in Old Norse as "ketill." In Middle English it is "ketel."

The definition is, a metal pot, usually with a lid for boiling or stewing. It is a synonym for cauldron. An early spouted teakettle can be seen in this illustration detail from Pedro de la Vega, Flos Sanctorum, Zaragoza, G. Coci, 1544.

Sooooo, perhaps not?


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Postby Cathryne » Fri Jun 06, 2008 7:08 pm

Ooops forgot to add the quote is from "A glossary of medieval and renaissance culinary terms"


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History of Kettle

Postby pigsxyz » Sat Jun 07, 2008 7:14 am

Many thanks for that, guess I'll have to keep using cauldren then,

cheers Ann



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Postby gregory23b » Mon Jun 09, 2008 4:16 pm

Anne, it also depends which 'kettle hat' you are after, the WOTr era ones are different from the 13th and 14thc ones that are rather common on the field.

I can suggest the Martyrdom of St Ursula from one variation at least.


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Postby pigsxyz » Wed Jun 11, 2008 10:21 am

lol. I mean the type you boil water in



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Postby gregory23b » Wed Jun 11, 2008 10:42 am

So you did, me being dense, sorry.


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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:24 pm

NOOOOOO!!! This cannot be true??? Jorge is wrong! What next? Cats and dogs lieing down together? Rain falling to the clouds? This is a sad day for me, now I know my master to be as falible as I am. :cry:


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Postby Alan E » Wed Jun 11, 2008 8:30 pm

S'OK Marcus, he just did that to prove his underlying empathy with Humanity.

Really he knew all along, and just pretended to make a mistake.


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Postby gregory23b » Wed Jun 11, 2008 9:49 pm

Hush Marcus, or I will have to sort yez.

I genuinely saw kettle and saw 'kettle hat', my reality filter or the filter that says, RTFQ was definitely off.

I make more mistakes than I have successes, I call it constructive cock-up making....the list is rather long, but people have better things to do.


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Postby Dave B » Wed Jun 11, 2008 10:22 pm

[quote="gregory23b"]
I genuinely saw kettle and saw 'kettle hat',quote]

Image

Wheras I though of this.

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Postby gregory23b » Mon Jun 16, 2008 5:24 pm

Obviously a biker joke.

I will laugh, but for different reasons ;-)


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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Mon Jun 16, 2008 7:57 pm

:?


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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Mon Jun 16, 2008 8:23 pm

Meaning my four leaved friend, that the obvious comment (from a non-biker - ie me) is 'that is not a kettle, it is a motorbike' - rather than be sneered at by great big hairy bikers, or Dave, I chose to laugh at my own ignorance. ;-)

<raspberry>


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Postby The Iron Dwarf » Mon Jun 16, 2008 9:52 pm

if you are in need of knowing about the bike do a search for 'the kettle club'
have met a few members at events in the past


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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Jun 18, 2008 7:20 am

:? :shock:


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Postby Wolf-Rampant » Wed Jun 18, 2008 2:48 pm

Marcus
I will make sure that the kettle we use does not contain petrol and rubber ,even if authentic or not lol



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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Jun 18, 2008 7:32 pm

So is a bike a kettle now? :oops:


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The Iron Dwarf
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Postby The Iron Dwarf » Wed Jun 18, 2008 7:35 pm



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http://uk.ebid.net/buddy/52487
new stuff inc chainshot + grenadoes.
visit my place and have a go

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Re: History of the Kettle

Postby Malvoisin » Wed Jun 18, 2008 8:53 pm

pigsxyz wrote:When we do gigs I see lots of people with blackened kettles. Are these appropriate for 15thc? I would much prefer to use one of these but have been told to find evidence of authenticity before I can put mine to use.

Anyone knowing the answer would be appreciated.

cheers Ann


The type of kettle in question has been knocking around in china for a couple of thousand years in one form or other. But what came first the ceramic teapot or the metal kettle?
The oldest known teapot (still intact)is from 1513 and is in the Flagstaff House Museum of Teaware in Hong Kong.
Image

Teapots as we know then didn't arrive in europe until tea became popular at the end of the 17thC. The chinese used to ship the tea with the porcelain teapots as it wasn't until the1760's that a way to make porcelain was devised in britain.

The suzuki motor bike on the other hand is japanese. :wink:


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