Page 1 of 1

is that a real baby?....

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:51 am
by kate/bob
It's dawned on me that if anyone asks me intelligent questions about children in 15th c I will have no idea how to answer them. Could people let me know what sort of questions we're likely to get and the accepted answers?

ta

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 10:47 am
by Neil of Ormsheim
Your chances of being asked an intelligent question about children are so far beyond remote you will need the Hubble Space Telescope to spot them. I have lost count of the numbers of times I have been told that "They didn't have children in those days".
Being asked intelligent questions by children, however, is a much more likely event.

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 10:56 am
by gregory23b
What people really mean when they say

"did they have that then?"

is

"tell me more about it"

People, even intelligent ones do that, it is their way of breaking the ice between you, the dresser upper and them, the MOP.

kate/bob - I can suggest a read of "Growing up in Medieval London", by Barbara Hanawalt, great insight into life of children.

Kids are also covered in her other great book "the Ties that Bound".

She relies on coroners' reports for tracking the activities of children, place and age of death, gender, gives an idea of what they were up to.

Clearly kids were still kids, workling was generally restricted to light activities in the home and as they got stronger harder work.


Excellent reads though.

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:14 pm
by Vicky
gregory23b wrote:What people really mean when they say

"did they have that then?"

is

"tell me more about it"


Spot on!

Excellent reads though.


Seconded! :D

Posted: Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:59 pm
by James Bretlington
Neil of Ormsheim wrote:Being asked intelligent questions by children, however, is a much more likely event.


Lucky man. QWe usually get asked questions along the lines of - 'is that real food?' - 'Is that fire real?' Or one that they only direct at me ' Is that your real accent?'

Posted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 10:24 am
by The Methley Archer
Generally I get "can we take their picture" :D

But be careful, at Warwick last year I had my back turned for 1 minute to find my youngest in the arms of a MOP couple who took offence when took her out of their arms and told them off :x

Posted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 6:22 pm
by kate/bob
so I shouldn't expect to be quizzed on medieval childcare then! Thanks for the book suggestions just in case some intelligent people turn up.

Posted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 9:07 pm
by mally ley
A couple of other suggestions:

Medieval Children by Nicholas Orme.
He's also written one about medieval schools - which covers from roman to tudor times :?

Yesterday's Children by Sally Kevill-Daives
this one is a 'through the ages' one, but interesting none-the-less

I've not read either cover to cover, but dipped in to both.

Hope this helps.

Posted: Thu Jan 31, 2008 9:52 pm
by Gail Horn
Yesterday's Children by Sally Kevill-Daives

< Name drop mode>
If this is who I think it is, she is the wife of one of the ex-Rectors of the church I attend... She's also well known in the ceramics world.
<name drop mode off>

Posted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 8:52 am
by kate/bob
I imagine that there aren't that many people around with that name!

Posted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 6:17 pm
by ViscontesseD'Asbeau
My older kids spend their time gambling - cards and dice - in the 17thC so it's pretty self evident what they're doing. :D

The younger ones, whatever period we've been re-enacting, just tend to get stalked for their cute photos (ditto local papers covering events - never bothered about the fancy people wearing £1000 worth of kit, but head straight for the baby/toddlers in the rubbishy outfit you knocked up the night before).

If I'm doing something living history my older ones might help out, so people can see them 'working' - again, is self evident what they're doing, then. Really depends on your role in living history, but the later periods seem more fun for the kids as there's more they can do. :D We've been involved in groups where kids seem to have been not welcome and other groups where they're an essential part of what is done - so the prevailing dynamic of the group also affects how muc kids can and can't do and again, we've found the 17thC groups are much more child friendly and able to use kids effectively in what they're trying to achieve - in other words, if members of the public are asking you what the kids did - you've already failed to portray it well enough. Or you've found yourself in a group with an anti-kid atmosphere which can happen.

Posted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 7:00 pm
by Type16
I also feel that kids are valuable & integral members of any group -- including medieval. They add another facet to portrayals. Its a great medium for the quiet kids to 'shine' -- without ridicule from any hometown classmates. A really good environment for them to grow up in :D

Then there are the other aspects ...... washing up, firewood collecting & chopping, provide £loans from their pocket money (charge interest) for that extra bottle of Moniac,........ etc. etc. :twisted:

Sadly mine is now a teen who 'does not do washing up' :( ....... even for money!

Posted: Fri Feb 01, 2008 8:45 pm
by mattb
Just remember the reply to "is that a real baby?" is "no it's a replica, i made it myself."

Posted: Sat Feb 02, 2008 11:08 am
by James The Archer
Type16 wrote:Sadly mine is now a teen who 'does not do washing up' :( ....... even for money!

So they don't "DO" eating then?

But back to topic, kids are always important, ok some events work better for the kids than others, we did an event based on games and with our "group kids" leading the way we got lots of "MOP kids" playing much to everyones enjoyment.

Posted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 3:04 pm
by kate/bob
being as Islay's only 3 months old she's not going to be doing an awful lot apart from showing how medieval babies threw up on their clothes and managed to get poo all over everything!

I can't see that there's going to be a problem having a baby in our household as none of us have a mental age over about 4 anyway - afterall, our motto is "it seemed like a good idea at the time!".

Posted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 7:52 pm
by Cat
And she's got a whole raft of mad Aunties! Does Linz know what gender hers is yet? It would be kinda tidy to have one new Mooselet of each sex.

Posted: Sun Feb 03, 2008 7:56 pm
by the real lord duvet
i always say that by using the rule of primary course that only rich people had babies

most of the painting of kids are of rich kids

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 8:39 am
by kate/bob
G & L have decided to wait and see what flavour their baby is. We should know very soon though as it'll be cooked in a couple of weeks.

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 3:45 pm
by Karen Larsdatter
the real lord duvet wrote:i always say that by using the rule of primary course that only rich people had babies

most of the painting of kids are of rich kids

Depends on when you're looking for -- most of the 16th century paintings are of rich kids, but there's plenty of "poor kids" and some in-between, if you look hard enough. :lol:

It needs updating, but http://larsdatter.com/children.htm has some reasonably good details on this.

(I'm working on sewing my son a small version of the Herjolfsnes 62 tunic; at the next event we go to, his dad will be wearing his Herjolfsnes 63 cote, and I'll be wearing my Herjolfsnes 39 dress, so we'll all be Herjolfsneezing together, I s'pose! :wink: Hoping to get a little linen bib done, too.)

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 4:01 pm
by James Bretlington
Karen Larsdatter wrote:Herjolfsneezing


Gesundheit! :lol:

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 4:38 pm
by Vermin
the real lord duvet wrote:i always say that by using the rule of primary course that only rich people had babies

most of the painting of kids are of rich kids


Ah - I assume from this the poor had to make do with the rich's cast off kids and any they didn't want :)

Posted: Tue Feb 05, 2008 7:02 pm
by Laffin Jon Terris
But then, what use is a child who won't do the washing up?

Even if he is a richer family's cast off? :twisted:

Posted: Wed Feb 06, 2008 2:04 pm
by KezT
apart from the "did they have children then?" "is it real?" and "how do you turn the baby off?" (I wish i knew!) I have mostly been asked about what they wore, where, when and how they worked/played, and when they got a proper job/married/had babies of their own.

Oh, and from other mothers - what did they use for nappies? (not alot most of the time, moss sometimes), how do you stop them eating dirt? (I don't) and how do you get them to play like that? (stick them in a field without computers/TV/books & they play!)

People do seem to assume that they can just pick them up for photo oppotunities though:-) Mine have started begging money from gullible Americans!!!

Posted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 8:50 am
by kate/bob
I seem to have been under the mistaken belief that I might be asked some intelligent and sensible questions, after some of the things I've been asked in the past couple of years I should've known better really!

Posted: Thu Feb 07, 2008 9:04 am
by KezT
True - but there is always the one person/family at any event who keep you on your toes asking thoughtful and suitable questions.

You will probably discover they are actully another re-enactor in disguise, or maybe an archeologist But I have been asked some very good questions in my time - to balance the ridiculous :lol:

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2008 3:42 pm
by mattb
KezT wrote:True - but there is always the one person/family at any event who keep you on your toes asking thoughtful and suitable questions.

You will probably discover they are actully another re-enactor in disguise, or maybe an archeologist But I have been asked some very good questions in my time - to balance the ridiculous :lol:


So do reenactors in disguise as mops make athenticity mistakes? Like wizards pretending to muggles perhaps?

Posted: Tue Feb 12, 2008 4:20 pm
by m300572
KezT wrote:True - but there is always the one person/family at any event who keep you on your toes asking thoughtful and suitable questions.

You will probably discover they are actully another re-enactor in disguise, or maybe an archeologist But I have been asked some very good questions in my time - to balance the ridiculous :lol:


Nope, that sensible family are probably the ones home educating the kids -the reencators in disguise are the ones trying to wind you up by asking REALLY stupid things! :roll:

Posted: Mon Feb 25, 2008 12:28 am
by LaydeIsabella
m300572 wrote:
KezT wrote:True - but there is always the one person/family at any event who keep you on your toes asking thoughtful and suitable questions.

You will probably discover they are actully another re-enactor in disguise, or maybe an archeologist But I have been asked some very good questions in my time - to balance the ridiculous :lol:


Nope, that sensible family are probably the ones home educating the kids -the reencators in disguise are the ones trying to wind you up by asking REALLY stupid things! :roll:


I seem to remember this being followed by the line "E's a re-inactor, get 'im!"