TENNIS BALLS

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jelayemprins
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TENNIS BALLS

Post by jelayemprins »

Does anyone know about medieval tennis ball construction please?
Keen to hear back .
And not the shape- even I can guess that part...
:lol:

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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

'With the evolution of the racket, the tennis balls also underwent frequent alterations. The first tennis ball was wooden. It gave way to a bouncier, leather ball filled with cellulose material.'

http://www.historyoftennis.net/

'These games were played by striking the ball with a bare hand. The original ball used was made of tightly rolled cloth pieces stitched together'

http://www.edunetconnect.com/cat/games/tennis.html


' Alexander Barclay (1508) mentions that balls were, made with the bladders of pigs when they were slaughtered. The bladders were blown up with air and beans and peas put in to rattle around inside, and games were played with them that involved striking with the hands and feet.6 This construction is almost certainly that of the Cambok ball. Other games with sticks referenced have small hard balls, but the large size of the ball in the manuscript illustration makes it most likely that an inflated ball of the type described by Barclay was used, rather than a solid or heavily packed ball.

A seam is clearly visible in the manuscript illustration, and runs straight across the ball. A tennis ball of the 16th century found in the roof beams of Westminster Hall has similar seams,7 so it is very likely that the Cambok ball was made with a leather cover of the same design. The pattern is quite simple: four pieces of leather are sewn together to mark the ball with seams running from one pole to the other, sort of an "orange quarter" construction. Modern footballs and rugby balls are made in a similar fashion. If the leather pieces are the right shape the resulting ball can be spherical, like the Cambok ball or the Westminster tennis ball.

I did not have a pig's bladder convenient when I made the ball, so I took a cheap commercial inflatable ball and put that inside the leather skin, and it worked admirably. '

http://64.233.183.104/search?q=cache:RN ... =firefox-a


:D
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jelayemprins
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Tennis & football

Post by jelayemprins »

Anyone wish to hazard the rules circa 1400?

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Post by m300572 »

There is a 'Real Tennis' Society - they should have any early rules I'd have thought.
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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

Ian, apparently football was forbidden in a 1363 edict :shock:
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Post by gregory23b »

IIRC Real Tennis is played at Hampton Court.

There is a surviving leather ball - use not specified, stitched and filled with moss/tow??
middle english dictionary

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Post by lidimy »

Oh - didn't read properly -

the second bit is for a different game called Cambok.

But that was outlawed in 1363 too apparently. But the bit I quoted does mention a surviving Tennis ball - maybe the same one as mentioned by Jorge?
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Karen Larsdatter
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Re: TENNIS BALLS

Post by Karen Larsdatter »

I'm going to be lazy, and just reply to a bunch of postings with vaguely relevant webpages ... 8)
jelayemprins wrote:Does anyone know about medieval tennis ball construction please?
http://www.employees.org/~cathy/tennis.html
jelayemprins wrote:Anyone wish to hazard the rules circa 1400?
http://www.florilegium.org/files/ENTERT ... s-art.html
lidimy wrote:Ian, apparently football was forbidden in a 1363 edict :shock:
http://the-orb.net/encyclop/culture/tow ... vnt07.html
http://victoria.tc.ca/~tgodwin/duncanwe ... eball.html
gregory23b wrote:IIRC Real Tennis is played at Hampton Court.
http://www.realtennis.gbrit.com

Another interesting site: http://www.real-tennis.nl

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gregory23b
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Post by gregory23b »

The Hampton court one is a short spit from where the kitchens are, couldn't remember if it was real tennis there or not, ta Karen, how are things?
middle english dictionary

Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

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Post by Phil the Grips »

The other Real Tennis court is in Oxford- tis how one of my uncles recieved his full Blue at uni there.
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Post by Mark Griffin »

contact ghandi re tennis balls, he's made a copy of the one found at Westiminster. there are a couple of other ones found archeologically. They are the same pattern more or less as a modern one, i.e. the lines around the balkl mimic the sewing lines of the original. Buy one and make a pattern. make in leather and stuff with moss, horse hair or the like.
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Post by behanner »

Years and years ago I was interested in medieval games and I made several balls trying to figure out how to make one with enough bounce. The key seemed to be wrapping quite tightly. I mostly used yarn for my experiments but I found a reference to usingstrips of wool which would make sense. I was able to make a ball that bounced decently but don't expect a modern tennis ball bounce.

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