Search found 761 matches

by Brother Ranulf
Tue Aug 11, 2015 4:59 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sickles in the wars of the roses
Replies: 5
Views: 2814

Re: Sickles in the wars of the roses

It's true that many military weapons developed from agricultural tools - but this happened long before your period. If you are thinking of a peasant revolt, such as that in England in 1381, then the agricultural masses would arm themselves in exactly that way. If you are thinking of trained, profess...
by Brother Ranulf
Fri Jul 10, 2015 3:23 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Egyptian shenti
Replies: 8
Views: 2331

Re: Egyptian shenti

I have enlarged and boosted part of my earlier image. What you see as rabbit ears is simply the way a bow was shown - the strip of linen used as belt was tied with a simple bow as seen here: field workers - Copy.jpg In this case the kilt is made of a piece of linen which is curved at both ends; one ...
by Brother Ranulf
Thu Jul 09, 2015 9:19 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Egyptian shenti
Replies: 8
Views: 2331

Re: Egyptian shenti

Rabbit ears? (I'll come back to that). Men's clothing in ancient Egypt evolved over time and was also variable depending on status, age and occupation. The simplest version was a simple wrap-around short kilt of white linen, not pleated and held in place by a strip of linen used as a belt, tied in a...
by Brother Ranulf
Thu May 07, 2015 9:37 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: 14th Century Female Headgear
Replies: 4
Views: 1825

Re: 14th Century Female Headgear

Welcome to the forum. Images from manuscripts are always a good starting point - they were painted by people at the time who recorded exactly what they saw (with the occasional whimsy thrown in just for fun). The Luttrell Psalter is one example, dating to the period 1320 - 1340 and it includes vario...
by Brother Ranulf
Thu May 07, 2015 6:24 am
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: Early Mail Length/Shape
Replies: 4
Views: 2054

Re: Early Mail Length/Shape

The Normans (who were essentially Frenchified Vikings who took control of England) continued to produce and prescribe both long and short hauberks well into the 12th century and beyond for feudal levy troops, depending on their wealth. The Assize of Arms of 1181 makes a clear distinction (in the ori...
by Brother Ranulf
Tue Apr 28, 2015 6:49 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 15th century first aid/ medicine
Replies: 6
Views: 2921

Re: 15th century first aid/ medicine

"First Aid" as we understand it today grew out of the mobilization of female locals to tend the wounded at the battle of Solferino in 1859; they were organised into units and issued with dressings and other equipment. Prior to that time medical care was more like "Fifth Aid", wit...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Apr 15, 2015 9:10 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: How accurate are leather gauntlets as armour?
Replies: 17
Views: 6432

Re: How accurate are leather gauntlets as armour?

In the absence of archaeological finds it is logical to look at the documentary evidence concerning gloves and armour. Anglo-Norman French has the word gant , which is used for various types of glove, including a glove worn with armour. This turns up in 12th and 13th century texts describing leather...
by Brother Ranulf
Thu Apr 09, 2015 10:58 am
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: "Dark Age" Chairs?
Replies: 9
Views: 4107

Re: "Dark Age" Chairs?

Chairs seem to be associated with relatively high status throughout the Saxon/Viking period and into the high medieval. Low- and mid-status was linked to sitting on the floor, on a stool or bench (or "form"), which is hardly conducive to a healthy spine. The chair at St. Paul's, Jarrow, ha...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Mar 30, 2015 6:43 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: Antler comb
Replies: 6
Views: 2400

Re: Antler comb

It's by the same writer and was published by the Finds Research Group some time ago - it covers a much longer period than I remembered (but I have not looked at it for some time):

http://www.kdmdc.co.uk/resources_files/FRG_40_Combs.pdf
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Mar 29, 2015 9:18 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: Antler comb
Replies: 6
Views: 2400

Re: Antler comb

This article from "Medieval Archaeology vol. 53" looks at Viking bone and antler combs found in Scotland and gives a typology for the various forms: http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/10247/1/Steve_Ashby_Med_Arch_53.pdf I know of another article looking at English 11th-12th century comb forms ...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Mar 25, 2015 7:47 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: Lamps
Replies: 2
Views: 1703

Re: Lamps

According to P G Foote and D M Wilson (The Viking Achievement, 1974 edition): The fire also provided illumination, but lamps of soapstone filled with oil were common. Two types of lamp are known; a simple open bowl, sometimes with suspension loops, and a bowl set on an iron spike which could be stuc...
by Brother Ranulf
Sat Feb 28, 2015 8:52 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Standards, Pennons, and Banners
Replies: 5
Views: 1776

Re: Standards, Pennons, and Banners

Thanks to Phil for that image. The flag on the far right is a banner featuring what look like three frogs symbolising the Devil, then comes a pennon with bendlets, then a rectangular banner with chevrons and more pennons. Just for clarity: banner.jpg In the centre is a banner (Sir Hugh Hastings, die...
by Brother Ranulf
Fri Feb 27, 2015 8:07 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Standards, Pennons, and Banners
Replies: 5
Views: 1776

Re: Standards, Pennons, and Banners

Even in the 13th century there was no governing body to supervise heraldry or flags in England so standard sizes and uniformity would be unlikely. Many people have studied manuscript images and tried to come up with "typical" sizes, but these are only estimates and by no means definite. On...
by Brother Ranulf
Sat Feb 21, 2015 9:55 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: ladies hair covering
Replies: 1
Views: 1254

Re: ladies hair covering

This is by no means a simple question. In today’s mainly non-religious society it is difficult for many people to appreciate the influence of religion in the lives of medieval people and how important were the views of the Church. Imagine a time when the local parish priest was a figure of huge auth...
by Brother Ranulf
Fri Feb 06, 2015 8:28 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: linen webbing for girths/surcingales
Replies: 6
Views: 2154

Re: linen webbing for girths/surcingales

The most detailed study of medieval horse furniture is the Museum of London's book on the subject, now available online here: http://virtuabis.free.fr/The%20Medieval%20Horse%20and%20its%20Equipment.pdf You will see that girths are hardly mentioned, simply because no examples have survived - only the...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Jan 26, 2015 8:10 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Linen Kirtles
Replies: 22
Views: 7266

Re: Linen Kirtles

Alice the Huswyf wrote term denoting a very, very, much earlier male garment . . . . I would argue that kirtle had skipped the fence to recognisably become a term of reference for a specifically female garment. The Middle English Dictionary gives the definition of the word kirtel (and its many varia...
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Jan 25, 2015 7:36 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Linen Kirtles
Replies: 22
Views: 7266

Re: Linen Kirtles

Absolutely right, Alice - and the boring old linguisics definitely support this idea. Middle English and Anglo-Norman French both include a wide range of terms for woollen material of different "calibres", just as for silks - many of these are obscure terms where the exact meaning has been...
by Brother Ranulf
Sat Jan 17, 2015 7:04 am
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: Glue
Replies: 3
Views: 1318

Re: Glue

"Daily Living in the Twelfth Century" mentions casein glue used to fix linen to plane tree wood for making organ bellows; there is also mention of fish glue and hide glue in different situations. This is a reasonable study of various types of medieval glues: http://www.rocks4brains.com/glu...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Jan 14, 2015 4:28 pm
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: 12th Century Cook Book "In the Works"
Replies: 8
Views: 4631

Re: 12th Century Cook Book "In the Works"

I have been in touch with the publisher (Prospect Books) who tell me that the delay in production is due to one of the writing team being taken seriously ill. I will not go into details, but it certainly explains the repeated delays. They say that the new publication date is expected to be July 2015...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:11 pm
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: 12th Century Cook Book "In the Works"
Replies: 8
Views: 4631

Re: 12th Century Cook Book "In the Works"

Well, I am really taken aback by developments on this. The original publication date has already been put back at least twice (now July 2015 according to the publisher's website) - but I just received a message from Amazon to say they have cancelled the order: Unfortunately, we’re no longer able to ...
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Jan 11, 2015 10:31 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: sword handle desgins
Replies: 1
Views: 1077

Re: sword handle desgins

A reasonable starting point would be Ewart Oakeshott's sword typologies, which cover blades, pommels and guards from Saxon/Viking to the 16th century: http://www.oakeshott.org/typo.html http://www.albion-swords.com/articles/oakeshott-typology.htm http://www.myarmoury.com/feature_oakeshott3.html http...
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Dec 14, 2014 8:59 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Where is the church in reenactment?
Replies: 38
Views: 6943

Re: Where is the church in reenactment?

The development of the rosary prayers has been covered in many books and websites and is fairly widely known; an example is this from Father Reginald Martin, O.P., a commentator in "The Rosary Light and Life" of March/April 2008: The prayer we call the "Hail Mary" has evolved ove...
by Brother Ranulf
Thu Dec 11, 2014 7:57 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Where is the church in reenactment?
Replies: 38
Views: 6943

Re: Where is the church in reenactment?

Thalion, All of the rosary prayers developed over time, particularly in the case of the Ave Maria. The Paternoster itself looked like this in the 13th century: Pater Noster, qui es in caelis, sanctificétur nomen tuum, adveniat regnum tuum, fiat volúntas tua, sicut in caelo et in terra. Panem nostrum...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Dec 08, 2014 7:40 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Where is the church in reenactment?
Replies: 38
Views: 6943

Re: Where is the church in reenactment?

I am surprised that no mention has been made of the Augustinian Canons Regular. Canons were guilds of priests living together under the Rule of St Augustine, often in priories, but mainly working out on the streets and ministering to the poor, the sick and the needy. They were superficially similar ...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Dec 03, 2014 7:21 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Where is the church in reenactment?
Replies: 38
Views: 6943

Re: Where is the church in reenactment?

At each friary there would be a majority of friars who were not ordained as priests, but with some among them ordained in order to conduct the services, hear confessions and so on. The major exception was among the Dominicans, who had a very large number of ordained priests because they were intende...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Dec 03, 2014 5:33 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Where is the church in reenactment?
Replies: 38
Views: 6943

Re: Where is the church in reenactment?

Conquest is only partly correct in saying that noblemen had priests attending them. Priests were almost always incumbents in parishes, serving the local population and depending onthem for income - mainly from performing marriages, burials and baptisms. They were appointed by whoever held the "...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Dec 03, 2014 8:14 am
Forum: Book, Film, TV & Music Reviews
Topic: Secrets of the Castle with Ruth Goodman
Replies: 24
Views: 5449

Re: Secrets of the Castle with Ruth Goodman

Guthrie, the evidence for clothes in garderobes is mainly based on linguistics, but it is confusing. A 13th century gloss translates the Latin repositariis as garderobe, where the Latin word is certainly a repository or store-room for linen and clothing. In "Ancient Petitions Relating to Northu...
by Brother Ranulf
Tue Dec 02, 2014 2:37 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Where is the church in reenactment?
Replies: 38
Views: 6943

Re: Where is the church in reenactment?

I honestly wasn't trying to put you off, in fact i am really pleased to see new people looking at the religious aspect of the hobby. I have seen some really bad attempts in the past and I guess it has made me anxious, or at least concerned. I do appreciate that having a Catholic background is a majo...
by Brother Ranulf
Tue Dec 02, 2014 8:09 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Where is the church in reenactment?
Replies: 38
Views: 6943

Re: Where is the church in reenactment?

It's a very good question and I believe the reasons are far more complex than just the reduction in faith mentioned by Saracen - after all, medieval Christianity (the Church of Rome) was very different to the Church of England experience most people of a certain generation grew up with over the past...

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