Search found 426 matches

by Merlon.
Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:17 am
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: Teracotta dishes - how horribly wrong are they?
Replies: 15
Views: 4356

Hraefn's post of Mon Mar 24, 2008 11:01 pm in this thread
by Merlon.
Wed Apr 23, 2008 1:30 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 15th C Scribes
Replies: 10
Views: 1364

by Merlon.
Tue Apr 22, 2008 8:22 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: 1780-1810-HELP!
Replies: 7
Views: 1905

The start of the Wikipedia entry on the Black Country reads:- "The Black Country is a loosely-defined area of the English West Midlands conurbation, to the north and west of Birmingham, and to the south and east of Wolverhampton, around the South Staffordshire coalfield. It has a combined popul...
by Merlon.
Wed Apr 16, 2008 2:55 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: knitting
Replies: 21
Views: 2325

Below is the longest sentence I have ever encountered in English!! I think I have caught all the transcription errors but apologies if any have got through, it will be obvious why they might have. The book contains Medicinal recipes, Angling instructions, Knitting instructions, Lace (cord) making an...
by Merlon.
Wed Apr 16, 2008 12:00 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: knitting
Replies: 21
Views: 2325

The knitting pattern in Natura Exenterata is a single sentence covering three pages!!!
If people want I can try and transcribe it and post it here from my copy of the book
by Merlon.
Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:56 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Extant felt items and references to felting
Replies: 9
Views: 1513

JAN KOCK & ELSE ROESDAHL (ed.). Boringholm: en østjysk traeborg fra 1300-årene/Boringholm: a fourteenth-century timber castle in eastern Jutland (Jysk Arkaeologisk Selskab Skrifter 53). 378 pages, numerous b&w & colour illustrations & tables. 2005. Højberg: Jysk Arkaeologisk Selskab;...
by Merlon.
Fri Apr 11, 2008 9:09 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Extant felt items and references to felting
Replies: 9
Views: 1513

The workshipful company of feltmakers of London at
http://www.feltmakers.co.uk/content/view/12/26/
indicates feltmakers were known in London in 1180
by Merlon.
Thu Apr 10, 2008 2:55 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Church bells - when did they appear?
Replies: 9
Views: 1569

All Monastries would have at least one monastic bell as that is how the day is regulated, that goes back to St Bernard and St Benedict. St. Egbert:- Archbishop of York in 750- said "Let all priests at the appointed hours of day and night ring the bells of their churches and then celebrate the d...
by Merlon.
Wed Mar 26, 2008 9:45 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: felt hat
Replies: 4
Views: 824

The picture is probably a Beaver hat rather than a felt hat. As Nigel says one source would be Dirty Billys, though not certain if his hats are actually Beaver A cheaper UK option would be Tom Norbury contact details are on http://www.livinghistoryfairs.com/traderscontacts.php Don't go any where nea...
by Merlon.
Sat Mar 22, 2008 10:42 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Embroidery frames
Replies: 29
Views: 4226

Tambour Hoops are 18th century so far as I can tell.
References start to crop up in the 1770s
by Merlon.
Tue Mar 11, 2008 8:30 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: History of the Fur Muff- Help Pls
Replies: 12
Views: 2310

Earliest reference I know of is Ben Jonson
The fountaine of selfe-love, or Cynthias revels (1601, 1616)
II. ii. 47 She alwayes weares a Muffe
by Merlon.
Tue Mar 11, 2008 8:54 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Period plant growing
Replies: 35
Views: 14761

Woad is a very hungry plant and needs plenty of nitrogen to grow. lots of blood and bone meal is needed to get a good plant. Other thing to bear in mind is what has been grown on the plot in the past. Many of the plots on my allotment site have clubroot in the ground, this will cripple woad and most...
by Merlon.
Mon Mar 10, 2008 7:44 pm
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: seasonal produce and imports
Replies: 7
Views: 2342

Couple of books you could try and get through inter library loan are Cabbages and Kings: The Origins of Fruit and Vegetables Author Jonathan Roberts ISBN: 0002202077 Food in Early Modern England: Phases, Fads, Fashions Author Joan Thirsk ISBN: 185285538X As to the importing of food stuffs that depen...
by Merlon.
Sun Mar 09, 2008 4:23 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Firing Bows?
Replies: 43
Views: 6484

Could not resist joining in. I have texts from the 1520s printed in English so your arguement is already flawed. Athens is the academic system which provides access to scolastic resources across the Internet, so in itself contains no information. Can you advise which resources accessed via Athens yo...
by Merlon.
Fri Mar 07, 2008 9:20 pm
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: seasonal produce and imports
Replies: 7
Views: 2342

What timeframe is your display covering?
The correct varieties of fruit can keep for several months, though you will need to look to the heritage ranges
by Merlon.
Tue Mar 04, 2008 10:45 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Overstitching thread ...
Replies: 11
Views: 2215

You could contact The Handweavers Studio

http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Agora/9814/

mightbe able to help
by Merlon.
Wed Feb 27, 2008 2:33 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Household Books & Robert Grosseteste
Replies: 7
Views: 1315

Is it not listed on http://www.grosseteste.com/index.htm?

The boke of keruynge was reprinted some years ago I have a spare copy somewhere which you can have for £5. PM me if you are interested.

Is 16th century too late for you, I have texts from then
by Merlon.
Mon Feb 18, 2008 3:11 pm
Forum: 1485-1603
Topic: Elizabethan search warrants
Replies: 8
Views: 2135

Jesuit hunting was part of state policy and the warrants for them are issued by the Privy Council, so you start off in high power territory. Even Norfolk or Essex can't ignore or dismiss one of their warrants, kind of "access all areas". A Warrant issued by a magistrate would not have any ...
by Merlon.
Mon Feb 18, 2008 12:09 pm
Forum: 1485-1603
Topic: Elizabethan search warrants
Replies: 8
Views: 2135

The warrants would have been arrest warrants which entitle holder to search for the individual(s) concerned. Currently trying to locate Edmund Campion's and Father Garnet's, they were on line a couple of years ago. Richard Topcliffe managed to get arrest warrants which also authorised torture short ...
by Merlon.
Sat Feb 16, 2008 5:29 pm
Forum: 1603-1715
Topic: ECW Infantry Buff Coat
Replies: 137
Views: 50069

Can one ask how the sergeant would afford to buy a £1 buffcoat, that’s twenty days gross pay? Sergeants and above were responsible for buying their own clothes and equipment. So they definitely look different from the soldiers, thorny problem would then be, what form would the cheaper buffs take? Sh...
by Merlon.
Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:21 pm
Forum: 1603-1715
Topic: ECW Infantry Buff Coat
Replies: 137
Views: 50069

Trained Band Buff would all be private purchase.
Being a member of the Trained band, especially in London, indicated a degree of social status.
Only London troops who were issued equipment of any form were the various auxilary regiments
by Merlon.
Sun Feb 10, 2008 10:58 am
Forum: Pictures
Topic: Thus far..
Replies: 31
Views: 3044

Certainly looks that way

Lidimy you are about twenty to thirty pounds offf looking fat. The kirtle is looking fine, quite often its chaos up until the last fitting and it all comes together.
by Merlon.
Sat Feb 09, 2008 12:07 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Firing Bows?
Replies: 43
Views: 6484

ploughing throuh the OED give the following examples of earliest written evidence known to them. fire 1590 SIR J. SMYTH Disc. Weapons 21 The Harquebuziers giving fire with their matches..to the touchpowder. loose 1. Archery. The act of discharging an arrow 1519 W. HORMAN Vulg. 283b, Geue a smarte lo...
by Merlon.
Fri Feb 08, 2008 5:01 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23846

Nigel you wanted an earlier reference Finally looked in the OED for fustain fustian 1. Formerly, a kind of coarse cloth made of cotton and flax. Now, a thick, twilled, cotton cloth with a short pile or nap, usually dyed of an olive, leaden, or other dark colour. c1200 Trin. Coll. Hom. 163 e meshakel...
by Merlon.
Fri Feb 08, 2008 4:38 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23846

Well, as previously said you can't have cotton, you might get away with fustian. It is unlikely that material from a remnant shop such as Abakhans will accurately represent such fabric. Possibly you should show a picture of the cloth that you believe accurately 13th century textile containing cotton...
by Merlon.
Fri Feb 08, 2008 2:04 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23846

I presume you mean Abakhans in Liverpool, their hey-day was back in the early nineties. These days the quality of their cloth is extremely variable as are their cloth descriptions
by Merlon.
Fri Feb 08, 2008 12:59 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23846

Evening, Nigel depends on what you mean about a usage context. Do you want one for the cotton staple, cotton element in cloth or cotton cloth as we would regard it today. This entire thread seems to suffer from the reenactor ailment of taking words out of context. The Mazzaoui text "The Cotton ...
by Merlon.
Thu Feb 07, 2008 9:36 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23846

cotton references actually being wool. If you look in the OED you find A woollen fabric of the nature of frieze, largely manufactured in Lancashire, Westmorland, and Wales (Manchester, Kendal, and Welsh cotton). attrib. 1503 Privy Purse Exp. Eliz. of York (Beck Draper's Dict.), For v yerdes of cotto...
by Merlon.
Wed Feb 06, 2008 2:08 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23846

In the 17th century the phrase "Good Welsh cotton" is used to refer to woollen cloth used for the manufacture of stocking. So it is not just a question of mistaking cotton for wool by the people at the time concerned. But whether reenactors can be certain that the reference to cotton that ...
by Merlon.
Fri Feb 01, 2008 2:11 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Matches - lighting fires before their invention
Replies: 32
Views: 6524

Per Oxford English dictionary earliest reference to sulphur spills as 'spunks' is 1755. "1755 JOHNSON, Sponk, a word in Edinburgh which denotes a match, or any thing dipt in sulphur that takes fire: as, any sponks will ye buy?" Spunk also meant prepared tinder as early as 1582 Spill as in ...

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