Search found 761 matches

by Brother Ranulf
Mon Dec 01, 2014 8:46 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Linen Kirtles
Replies: 22
Views: 7808

Re: Linen Kirtles

Checking "The Medieval Tailor's Assistant" I notice that it becomes uncharacteristically coy when confronted with the issue you raised. Under the heading of Linen, Canvas and Cotton, it says on page 64: None of these materials seem to have been used for visible outer garments such as surco...
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Nov 30, 2014 11:03 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Linen Kirtles
Replies: 22
Views: 7808

Re: Linen Kirtles

Ann, The short answer is no. The long answer could take more typing than I am up for just now, but I will aim to condense as far as possible. The first problem is that the word kirtle, in various forms, was used from as early as the 9th century until the present day to indicate a variety of differen...
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Nov 30, 2014 7:03 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Linen Kirtles
Replies: 22
Views: 7808

Re: Linen Kirtles

Which period of history, please?
by Brother Ranulf
Sat Nov 22, 2014 6:13 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Weapons identification
Replies: 5
Views: 3720

Re: Weapons identification

The sword shares many features with this Royal Naval cutlass of the late 18th century. It has a 29 inch blade and a cylindrical iron grip. Cutlasses were often straight, despite modern misconceptions: cutlass.JPG EDIT: The RN cutlass pattern changed in 1804 and this was the style used from around 17...
by Brother Ranulf
Sat Nov 22, 2014 7:12 am
Forum: Book, Film, TV & Music Reviews
Topic: Secrets of the Castle with Ruth Goodman
Replies: 24
Views: 5516

Re: Secrets of the Castle with Ruth Goodman

Thanks Merlon, that's an interesting little video.
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Nov 19, 2014 8:12 am
Forum: Book, Film, TV & Music Reviews
Topic: Secrets of the Castle with Ruth Goodman
Replies: 24
Views: 5516

Secrets of the Castle with Ruth Goodman

I have been looking forward to the latest offering from the Victorian/Edwardian Farm team, despite the fact that the production company is again the very dubious Lion TV. Behind-the-scenes rumours suggest that Ruth Goodman is less than happy with the finished series, but her concerns have not been e...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:44 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: late 12th early 13th century ecclesiastical vestments
Replies: 3
Views: 2891

Re: late 12th early 13th century ecclesiastical vestments

Just to illustrate the point about the mitre, this alabaster carving in the V&A of "the consecration of Thomas Becket" was made in the 15th century - and it is horribly wrong. The mitres have outwardly sloping sides, unlike the vertical sides of the 12th/13th centuries: http://collecti...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Oct 27, 2014 3:13 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: late 12th early 13th century ecclesiastical vestments
Replies: 3
Views: 2891

Re: late 12th early 13th century ecclesiastical vestments

Steve, Apart from the mitre, the vestments of an archbishop changed only slightly throughout the medieval era and beyond. The mitre is a guide to dating, since it evolved at a specific pace and changed form in a recorded way. There are many surviving vestments from the second half of the 12th centur...
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Sep 21, 2014 8:28 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 12th Century Research
Replies: 3
Views: 1626

Re: 12th Century Research

I am not aware of any books in English specifically looking at individual families and their military contingents in the period you are interested in. The de Bohuns are mentioned in passing in many general books about the Domesday survey, the 12th century, the period of the Anarchy and the Baron's W...
by Brother Ranulf
Thu Sep 04, 2014 7:07 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 13th C. Literacy
Replies: 9
Views: 3662

Re: 13th C. Literacy

Saracen has covered it well, but I would urge extreme caution when looking at evidence for things like general literacy. People today are ready to accept a very few well-known examples of (for instance) women authors and scribes and then conclude that all women were capable of writing; or they take ...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Sep 01, 2014 6:38 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 13th C. Literacy
Replies: 9
Views: 3662

Re: 13th C. Literacy

I understand that Christopher de Hamel's brief but excellent and detailed book "Scribes and Illuminators" is prescribed reading at universities. It covers the evolutions in book production and exactly who was doing the writing and who was doing the buying, as well as changes in techniques ...
by Brother Ranulf
Fri Aug 29, 2014 1:27 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Nine Mens Morris
Replies: 8
Views: 4272

Re: Nine Mens Morris

The Finds Research Group published a short but useful datasheet on this subject some years ago (I think it is still available from them), covering mainly graffiti versions of the game - boards scratched on any convenient surface. There were a large number of names used over time and in different par...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Aug 27, 2014 4:46 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Occupation? Nun.
Replies: 14
Views: 4349

Re: Occupation? Nun.

As you said in your post, canons and canonesses were a distinct entity from monks and nuns - although that distinction is completely lost on most people today. They were certainly far more involved in the communities and more likely to spend time among the ordinary people. The "Regular" va...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Aug 27, 2014 3:24 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Occupation? Nun.
Replies: 14
Views: 4349

Re: Occupation? Nun.

This is beginning to look like "think of a scenario, then try to force the evidence to support it". The Benedictine nuns of West Malling Abbey produced huge amounts of honey during the 12th century and presented much of it to the bishop of Rochester - but it was not taken to him by the nun...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Aug 25, 2014 9:31 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: what were mail makers called?
Replies: 3
Views: 1135

Re: what were mail makers called?

I have just been trawling through manuscripts for 12th century occupation terms and at that time it was haberger/hauberger and various variants. The earliest mention is some time before 1174. Clearly this comes from hauberk, but it means a maker of any mail armour; by the late 12th century the coif ...
by Brother Ranulf
Wed Aug 20, 2014 7:43 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Occupation? Nun.
Replies: 14
Views: 4349

Re: Occupation? Nun.

The complete lack of medieval nuns running loose around the country has been covered in other threads; becoming a nun meant (among other things) becoming reclusive, retiring from the world and all its temptations. To emphasise this point, Þe Ancrene Riwle of the early 13th century was written as an ...
by Brother Ranulf
Fri Jul 25, 2014 6:51 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: academic hood, cambridge pattern
Replies: 3
Views: 2145

Re: academic hood, cambridge pattern

Are you thinking of the original 1200 style caputium, the 13th/14th century type, the 15th century version, post-medieval or modern? Undergraduate, graduate, master, bachelor, doctor?
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Jul 20, 2014 8:35 am
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: 12th Century Cook Book "In the Works"
Replies: 8
Views: 4972

Re: 12th Century Cook Book "In the Works"

The book is now available at Amazon for pre-order, with a publication date of 1 September 2014:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Zinziber-Twelft ... s=zinziber
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Jul 13, 2014 9:42 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 13th century armour
Replies: 9
Views: 2173

Re: 13th century armour

While there is no direct evidence for mosaic pattern books, there is plenty of indirect evidence which for me makes the case "proven beyond reasonable doubt". A careful analysis of late 12th century sculptural motifs and decorations shows almost identical themes appearing all over England ...
by Brother Ranulf
Sun Jul 13, 2014 7:19 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 13th century armour
Replies: 9
Views: 2173

Re: 13th century armour

Italian armour in the late 12th/early 13th century had much Byzantine and German influence so it was very distinct from the Anglo-Norman styles I have previously researched. I found this frieze, originally in Milan and known as the Poarta Romana Frieze: porta romana frieze milan.jpg This shows the M...
by Brother Ranulf
Fri Jul 11, 2014 9:41 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 13th century armour
Replies: 9
Views: 2173

Re: 13th century armour

Mosaicists used pattern books from which the client could choose a particular ornamental style or scene; it is possible that these Ravenna patterns had first been used in the 12th century and were still being churned out in the 13th. It's also possible that there were a range of qualities of mosaic ...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Jul 07, 2014 6:36 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Feathers used for fletching.
Replies: 3
Views: 1486

Re: Feathers used for fletching.

We often forget that geese were kept as domesticated poultry for their eggs, often in large numbers, on every manor across the country. It is fact that the pterylae (feather-growing zones in the skin) can regenerate replacement feathers if the base of the old feather is left in place - so it is poss...
by Brother Ranulf
Fri Jun 27, 2014 7:31 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: bee skeps
Replies: 8
Views: 4350

Re: bee skeps

Regarding quantities of honey being produced, Bee Wilson in her book "The Hive" (ISBN-13: 978-0719565984, published by John Murray in 2005) suggests that by the 1100s people in England were eating 2 kilos of honey each per year; the population was perhaps 2.5 million in 1100. In one small ...
by Brother Ranulf
Tue Jun 24, 2014 7:17 am
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: bee skeps
Replies: 8
Views: 4350

Re: bee skeps

Mead seems always to have been a fermented honey brew - for example Sanskrit madhu means a sweet drink made with honey, although it has sometimes been made with added spices and fruits. The Bosworth-Toller Dictionary gives mæd, medu, medudrenc, meodu, werod and beónbroþ as meaning mead; the word béo...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Jun 23, 2014 9:42 pm
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: Medieval tongs??
Replies: 11
Views: 4987

Re: Medieval tongs??

Just to illustrate some metalworking tongs, and to prove that monks did have a sense of humour, this is an illustration from the British Library manuscript Harley 315 of the first half of the 12th century. It was produced at Canterbury, but it shows St Dunstan working as a silversmith at Glastonbury...
by Brother Ranulf
Mon Jun 23, 2014 6:30 pm
Forum: 1485-1603
Topic: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times
Replies: 83
Views: 25372

Re: The Farm goes back to Tudor Times

Seconded. In the photo I posted above of the shovel in use, Phil has an accurate 12th century hone/whetstone attached to his belt along with his knife. These are extremely well known from archaeological finds and are generally perforated for suspension at the belt or around the neck: PAS 446 hone st...
by Brother Ranulf
Sat Jun 21, 2014 9:40 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Am I a foundling?
Replies: 1
Views: 1312

Re: Am I a foundling?

It's an interesting question and I don't know that there is a specific answer. Middle English founden plus -ling simply means something small that has been found [so: an abandoned child], but some definitions add that it is a child whose parents are not known. Where this fits in the etymology I can'...
by Brother Ranulf
Thu Jun 12, 2014 1:17 pm
Forum: Forum Technical Support and News
Topic: Post Spam Messages Here
Replies: 224
Views: 112805

Re: Post Spam Messages Here

New user "Queenwalts", only one posting which seems very odd to me:

viewtopic.php?f=18&t=34190&p=364255#p364255
by Brother Ranulf
Sat May 31, 2014 7:27 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: 1914-1918 Buckle belt
Replies: 2
Views: 1249

Re: 1914-1918 Buckle belt

Sometimes Etsy has some reasonably priced stuff - genuine silver buckles can be huge money. See if any of these are suitable:

https://www.etsy.com/market/edwardian_belt
by Brother Ranulf
Fri May 30, 2014 9:29 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: A silly cloak question
Replies: 6
Views: 2465

Re: A silly cloak question

That's outside my own period of research - I guess the semi-circular cloak would be common at that time, but there were certainly other styles. Try the Medieval Taylor's Assistant, beginning at page 173: http://www.gjar-po.sk/~kassayova9c/the%20medieval%20tailor%27s%20assistant.pdf Maybe others on t...

Go to advanced search