Search found 77 matches

by Chickun
Thu Nov 24, 2005 12:40 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

yeah totally! I used to have a thoroughbred a few years ago that was fine with big, noisy farm machine running around at full speed unloading the big bales of straw from the back of a flat bed truck. Went right up next to it and was no problems. He'd then proceed to rear at cattle, spook at plastic ...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 24, 2005 11:17 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

A foot, represented by ' is 12 inches (three hands).

What I find ironic is when they don't bat an eyelid going past a big vehicle but then totally freak out at some odd patterns in the mud in front of you :roll:
by Chickun
Thu Nov 24, 2005 10:16 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

You can't be that far away from me then! If you get a chance go to the Fitzwilliam in Cambridge, they have a fair smattering of equestrian kit from most periods.
by Chickun
Thu Nov 24, 2005 10:10 am
Forum: General History
Topic: What's wrong with the film a Knight's Tale
Replies: 49
Views: 8156

I think it's alright - what improves it alot is that it's not meant to be "authentic" and while there are loads of historical innaccuracies at least it brings certain concepts of medieval life to the general public. There are a lot worse films out there!
by Chickun
Wed Nov 23, 2005 5:05 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Yeah I may well see if I can make it, if only for that! It's supposed to be a rather large event I believe?

IMHO for late 15th C hobilars are much more valid troop types in England, with heavilly armed knights/men at arms fighting on foot of course.
by Chickun
Wed Nov 23, 2005 4:30 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Wow, 100 horse charge sounds like real fun! Not really bothered myself about jousting - more into lighter horse/hobilar stuff.

Nice horse pics above BTW!
by Chickun
Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:41 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Ouch! The RA did a Norman Knight demo charging a shield wall, and it was rather impressive by all accounts. Have also seen some trotting horses in a dodgy parade somewhere break free because they were intentionally spooked by some t*at, resultining in the three/four of them galloping full pelt down ...
by Chickun
Wed Nov 23, 2005 3:03 pm
Forum: Pictures
Topic: Huan the unhappy re-enactor
Replies: 3
Views: 1840

aw, bless!!!
by Chickun
Wed Nov 23, 2005 11:01 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Ha! The number of times that I have driven past the racehorse museum!! LOL!!! Shall have to go!

Been to the national stud and that is really cool as well.
by Chickun
Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:04 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Don't know that much about the earlier stuff, but the "average" height of skeletons from London and Scottish sites is 14-14.2hh, so you're not far off. 16hh is the max, and 15-15.2 considered a "good" height for a warhorse. I have some academic papers about cheek pieces and bits from pre-roman to sa...
by Chickun
Tue Nov 22, 2005 9:55 am
Forum: Pictures
Topic: Normans in the US.
Replies: 25
Views: 10723

Good stuff, looks like you've put loads of effort in! Look forward to more piccies!
by Chickun
Thu Nov 17, 2005 10:43 am
Forum: General History
Topic: bardiches, can anyone gave me a history?
Replies: 16
Views: 4026

There's a 15thC (I believe) in the RA in Leeds, they certainly are contemporary. Can't recall seeing them in anything like Beauchamp or suchlike. Doubt they'd have been common at all in England - As Dom says you may well get the odd one or two floating around the odd continental mercenary - personal...
by Chickun
Fri Nov 11, 2005 2:50 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Alan Totally agree there is alot more to history than the battles; in fact the battles (certainly in England) were largely something that affected "other" people on the whole, so by modern re-enactors focusing on battles it gives a skewed perception of late medieval history....anyway that's for anot...
by Chickun
Fri Nov 11, 2005 1:33 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

When I said "elitism" I didn't mean it on the part of the rider towards foot soldiers, what would perhaps be more accurate to say is that it can cause possible resentment within a group, some people seeing the horses as "flashy" and detracting from other activities...Somebody once said to me that ar...
by Chickun
Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:43 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

and for later periods they're too small Whic period are we talking about? Certainly in the 15th C the absolute maximum height based on period artwork and the remains uncovered in places such as London is 16hh, and that's an isolated example. Most are 14.2hh-15hh, little more than ponies and certain...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:25 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Didn't know if you were a Little Britain fan....
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:12 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

WIS

Your sig - not Kenny Craig is it???
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:07 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

There are a couple of groups that do that for 15th C, and at least one that I know that does "multi-period".
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 6:04 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

That's another thing - choosing the right "type". No breeds as such in the medieval period, not in the formal sense, but horses with certain attributes that met the requirements of their use. Most (and that is nearly all) travelling horses were "amblers", similar to Icelandic ponies and Peruvian pas...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 5:59 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

It's not that I am not prepared to do it, it's just that I cannot afford to spend £300 hiring a lorry for the weekend to benefit some employers pocket. £300 would buy me a decent pair of clippers, or a Stubben bridle, etc etc. Haven't got transport and can't see myself getting any in the near future...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 5:49 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Yes kit is hard to get and expensive. There is nothing really like a medieval saddle that is easy to acquire and I am sure that modern saddlers would be hard pushed to re-create a medieval saddle; they are very different from a standard GP(General Purpose) saddle that you could buy in any saddlery i...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 5:38 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

I've been round the houses trying to get my boy to events, but it'll just never happen so far as I can see it....It hasn't stopped me doing the "living history" side of things in terms of experimental archeology, training, etc. Employers seem unwilling to pay the extra for horses unless it a big jou...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 10, 2005 5:09 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Use of Horses in Re-enactment
Replies: 91
Views: 18936

Cost...... Insurance, transportation mainly. Insurance seems to be erratic and increases with more than one animal. Transport costs (if you do not have your own lorry/box is £120-£150 per day). There are other factors such as if bringing a single animal will it be ok on it's own (horses being gregar...
by Chickun
Wed Nov 09, 2005 4:12 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Leeds Padded Jack
Replies: 29
Views: 4432

Yeah you promised me one ages ago - too much oak gall ink addled yer brain!

Anyway, here are a couiple of pics of the Lubeck ones:
by Chickun
Wed Nov 09, 2005 12:34 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: What's wrong with the movie Braveheart?
Replies: 84
Views: 14868

yeah but they are all leggy thoroughbred / Irish draught types, totally different to late 13th C destriers....
by Chickun
Mon Nov 07, 2005 2:57 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Medieval costume and furs...
Replies: 20
Views: 4657

It also prohibited maihoitered (sp?) doublets as well I believe to the same class of people?

Change of subject but something worth bearing in mind!
by Chickun
Mon Nov 07, 2005 1:32 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Whats wrong in Dark Age re-enactment
Replies: 61
Views: 8833

I want to know where the "inbred capital of suffolk" is.
by Chickun
Thu Nov 03, 2005 4:58 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: What's wrong in WOTR re-enactment?
Replies: 125
Views: 15805

Yeah, totally authenticity is, especially on the finer points, a matter of personal opinion. I guess organising a standard in anything would be difficult without an overall governing body, and even then ther'd be toys out of the pram when somebody disagreed about something. I guess you could say wha...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 03, 2005 4:24 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: What's wrong in WOTR re-enactment?
Replies: 125
Views: 15805

DomT - Yep pox scars and TB coughing etc etc etc. Agreed most re-enactors are "well fed" compared to 15th C people, and under-worked (physically). If we are talking purely about what is "wrong" with WotR re-enactment in the UK today then it is different really to the authenticity debate, especially ...
by Chickun
Thu Nov 03, 2005 10:06 am
Forum: General History
Topic: What's wrong in WOTR re-enactment?
Replies: 125
Views: 15805

"too many teeth" Apparently - The misconception that medieval people had black / rotting teeth is wrong. With the introduction of copious amounts of relatively cheap sugar from the colonies in the 16th and 17thC, oral hygiene went downhill in a big way rapidly. Before that in the medieval and earlie...

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