Search found 2239 matches

by gregory23b
Wed Jun 03, 2015 4:14 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: for pavise fans...
Replies: 5
Views: 1196

Re: for pavise fans...

'100 pavises of burnished silver gilt with the kings arms in the centre of each under a garter,'


yummy
by gregory23b
Thu May 28, 2015 11:13 am
Forum: General History
Topic: Anglo-Saxon remedy better than modern day antibiotics.
Replies: 5
Views: 1565

Re: Anglo-Saxon remedy better than modern day antibiotics.

Not as such because it involves artifice, ie using copper etc to create a medicine, not simply a use of ready ingredients. A lot of medicines are preparations, by definition not-natural. Modern aspirin is no less 'natural' just because it comes in tablet form.
by gregory23b
Mon Sep 01, 2014 9:27 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 13th C. Literacy
Replies: 9
Views: 1895

Re: 13th C. Literacy

ditto BR about Duhamel and the paper.

Or do a later period and use paper....
by gregory23b
Mon Sep 01, 2014 9:26 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: medieval copper sulphate?
Replies: 14
Views: 2365

Re: medieval copper sulphate?

copper filings are used to mordant blue dyes, the Strasbourg Manuscript has a blueberry and copper dye recipe for string. Copperas in the medieval sense is mostly ferrous sulphate or decomposed pyrites if found naturally, yet there are recipes which confuse this with copper. I have dyed bone with ve...
by gregory23b
Fri Jul 04, 2014 9:57 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Yeoman archer
Replies: 31
Views: 5219

Re: Yeoman archer

Re Froissart the 15th c images. They are later images potraying an earlier time, forget the apparent use of full plate by the archers, the archers at Poitiers and Crecy would not have been wearing 15thc armour of any sort, that should be a huge indicator that the images are not portraying reality, b...
by gregory23b
Thu Feb 13, 2014 5:04 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Long Bow Archers' Accuracy?
Replies: 18
Views: 4259

Re: Long Bow Archers' Accuracy?

'My 45 pound bow will just get 200 yards with flight arrows, that proves nothing really other than distance achieved, considering how high I have to aim my accuracy is a bit shite tbh, very shite in fact. So what are you saying? You can get the distance with an arrow matched to your bow weight, but ...
by gregory23b
Tue Feb 11, 2014 9:53 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Long Bow Archers' Accuracy?
Replies: 18
Views: 4259

Re: Long Bow Archers' Accuracy?

Simon, I think what the guys are saying is that you are 'supposing' and 'thinking', ie guessing (much like the rest of us) rather than showing information of the period, such information is the Holy Grail of many re-enactment archers or those interested in historical archery. 'Archers of the time we...
by gregory23b
Wed Jan 22, 2014 9:14 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Authentic Firelighting
Replies: 11
Views: 2190

Re: Authentic Firelighting

'Also it's unlikely people on long trips would have stocked up on char material for the whole journey prior to departure they would most likely expect to find some along the way. ' As the Vulgaria states, char cloth is one of a variety of combustibles. However, you could use your argument about any ...
by gregory23b
Mon Jan 20, 2014 8:11 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Authentic Firelighting
Replies: 11
Views: 2190

Re: Authentic Firelighting

'no modern anachronisms such as char cloth ' it is certainly not anachronistic, there are clear descriptions of using 'burned cloth'. It's called 'Vulgaria uiri doctissimi Guil. Hormani Caesariburgensis' and it's printed in 1519 :D http://livinghistory.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?f=18&t=6519 On t...
by gregory23b
Sun Jan 19, 2014 10:53 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Long Bow Archers' Accuracy?
Replies: 18
Views: 4259

Re: Long Bow Archers' Accuracy?

Are there copies of earlier statutes that we can browse to compare them with that one? Same it is not the law, un-repealed acts do not mean they are still legal, IIRC the 19thC defunct statutes law came into effect, laws that have not been enacted after a number of years become voided, can't remembe...
by gregory23b
Mon Dec 23, 2013 7:52 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

'although I don't think either of us know what the state of that is in 1415.'

indeed ;-)

At a pinch Will, I would opt for a light weight wool cloth, or the moleskin, regardless of which, the weight/thickness is the key.

Linen/canvas is used in garments and not just as a liner.
by gregory23b
Sun Dec 22, 2013 1:42 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

'Worth remembering, more generally, that Italy is not England; either in terms of climate or raw materials (England was supplying wool not just for itself, but a lot of Europe).' Yes, highlighting the breadth of European exports from as you say places of different climates, I can recommend that for ...
by gregory23b
Fri Dec 20, 2013 8:49 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

Ali at Herts is a hero. An interesting article on the cotton industry in Italy, lots of information on the range of cotton materials and blends, the emphasis early on is that cotton was a relatively inexpensive item made extensively in the Mediterranean for domestic markets and for export. Of partic...
by gregory23b
Wed Dec 18, 2013 6:27 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

Will, you can use wool for doublets, fustian was not the only material. 'If that's correct, you might expect the same to be true for cotton fustians. ' Possibly, but the edict against burning the cotton off the cloth suggests that it was not an expensive additive in that case. That author who summed...
by gregory23b
Wed Dec 18, 2013 2:51 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

'We're looking for circa 1400 here though, not 1500. Is there any suggestion for it earlier?' The cotton in fustian and bomabacina are earlier, check the MEd for a quick set of links. As for cotton cloth, I don't know of any pre 1500, but I have not really looked for it to be honest, something to co...
by gregory23b
Tue Dec 17, 2013 9:06 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

Hi Foxy, cotton fustians are mentioned in a late 15th century statute, a number of them, mainly as an edict against fustian makers from burning the cotton part of the fustian, as it weakened the cloth. Cotton prices, IIRC Mark Griffin may well have posted the actual statute here somewhere, I have re...
by gregory23b
Mon Dec 16, 2013 9:34 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

Will, fustian is not a high value cloth, it is a lower quality, the nap is a feature of it, that does not make it posh. The main thing to do is not assume that lower class cloth was all open and rough, there were many grades at many prices. The modern moleskin is a guess at the probable texture of m...
by gregory23b
Thu Dec 12, 2013 10:35 pm
Forum: Forum Technical Support and News
Topic: mark harris spammer
Replies: 1
Views: 1685

mark harris spammer

A huge run of posts of shite and pointless comments, with an obvious sales link
by gregory23b
Thu Dec 12, 2013 7:56 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

'It appears to be some kind of quilt or duvet, so definitely not for wearing under armour.' But that is why they are related, in terms of quilting/pointing, the term 'pourpoint' having related but different meanings, loads of medieval words are used in very different contexts, bloody difficult to pi...
by gregory23b
Mon Dec 09, 2013 7:33 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...
Replies: 63
Views: 8780

Re: Sleeveless Doublets for archers...

"Wearing a pourpoint AND a doublet would be like wearing a waistcoat under a shirt." "There wouldn't have been a pourpoint AND a doublet as they're basically the same thing in terms of what they do. A pourpoint is a thin, unlined garment, and wasn't in use until late 15th." <<< n...
by gregory23b
Mon Nov 18, 2013 7:40 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Yeoman archer
Replies: 31
Views: 5219

Re: Yeoman archer

I didn't dismiss them as fantasy, I said to compare them to other contemporary sources to get an idea of how 'realism' is portrayed in MSS, the Froissarts are of a style that is a bit odd, look at Jean Fouquet or the Rene de Anjou works and then you get a different standard of illustration and even ...
by gregory23b
Sat Nov 16, 2013 7:36 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Yeoman archer
Replies: 31
Views: 5219

Re: Yeoman archer

Look up MED, Paston Letters for references to the use of harness. harness can also mean the metal detail on things as knives. the point is that you can't simply exchange the word 'harness' to mean plate armour. pictures are also misleading, they are not always faithful representations, the 15thc Fro...
by gregory23b
Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:06 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Yeoman archer
Replies: 31
Views: 5219

Re: Yeoman archer

Harness/harnessed does not just mean plate, but dressed for war, it could just as easily be jacks.
by gregory23b
Tue Oct 22, 2013 8:17 pm
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: Suggestions for Medieval food
Replies: 5
Views: 2114

Re: Suggestions for Medieval food

rischewys

a paste of figs, dates, raisins, with cinnamon, cloves, pine nuts.

Rolled into balls, covered in thin pastry - 'like paper'.

Fried in oil, dee licious eaten cold or hot.
by gregory23b
Mon Oct 21, 2013 9:03 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Bollock dagger
Replies: 18
Views: 3536

Re: Bollock dagger

Phoenix, people don't as a rule, shame, more should. I can see very well from that photo that the leatherwork is crap, sorry, but it is not medieval, just some bog standard modern leather work the knife handle is some foreign wood, and at 30 quid it wont be better than poor. I say this because I am ...
by gregory23b
Fri Oct 18, 2013 7:15 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Bollock dagger
Replies: 18
Views: 3536

Re: Bollock dagger

I have a problem with that dagger, two as it happens, I can't see the wood type and the leather work is really poor, ie well put together but with no regard for medieval leatherwork, it looks like a lot of cheap Indian leatherwork. 30 quid is way too cheap IMHO.
by gregory23b
Wed Sep 25, 2013 4:26 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Newbie saying hi, and a question!
Replies: 42
Views: 6872

Re: Newbie saying hi, and a question!

Standardisation is a hard one to claim for weapons, especially when there is no regular army at home or abroad. If you read accounts of English bands of brigands, descriptions of weapons vary, eg bill, glaive langedebouf, spear - all possibly related or simply variations on a theme or cultural prefe...
by gregory23b
Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:06 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Free Short Course - England in the time of Richard III
Replies: 3
Views: 1146

Re: Free Short Course - England in the time of Richard III

Surely it should only cover a couple of years, he was only a king for a short time, not the whole century :devil: But seriously the WOTR was not the whole century and land use began to change well before the period not as a result of it, the Dickie thing is a convenient coat hanger, it would be more...
by gregory23b
Tue Sep 10, 2013 8:22 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Ink recipes
Replies: 11
Views: 2662

Re: Ink recipes

The oak gall ink or tannin/iron inks are the ones to use for your time frame, they are almost ubiquitous for about 2000 years until the turn of the 20th century in slightly different forms. Guthrie is right to point you to the Divers Arts, his recipe is hawthorn bark but still relies on the chemical...
by gregory23b
Wed Jul 03, 2013 9:18 pm
Forum: 1485-1603
Topic: Tudor hierarchy - or perhaps just Kentwell
Replies: 8
Views: 3486

Re: Tudor hierarchy - or perhaps just Kentwell

The big problem of the late middle ages is trying to define class then as we accept it now, they are not analogous. There was not a 'mercantile class' as such, but simply commoners who sometimes were very well off (or not) due to trade, some of them become ennobled and others do not as Red says. The...

Go to advanced search