Search found 18 matches

by Heloise
Wed Jul 30, 2008 11:56 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: 15th C jewelery for women
Replies: 7
Views: 1373

Another vote for Toby at the Silver Wyvern - he made a wonderful silver reliquary for me and a gorgeous brooch as a present for the boyfriend. Lovely stuff and delivers when he says he will, so I highly recommend him.
by Heloise
Mon Jun 02, 2008 9:56 pm
Forum: Pictures
Topic: Templecombe
Replies: 14
Views: 1673

Who is it in the video? I wasn't there and don't normally do that period but am curious all the same.
by Heloise
Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:14 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Embroidery frames
Replies: 29
Views: 4204

Hi - I have done pricking and pouncing successfully. I found the hardest bit was keeping the paper still on the cloth! I used quite substantial paper and put in holes c.5mm apart. I used ground charcoal for the powder. A piece a wool was scrunched up, dipped in the charcoal and pressed quite firmly ...
by Heloise
Wed Feb 06, 2008 8:43 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23605

It does look a bit unlike anything else I've seen, I have to admit. Again, I would be interested in your primary evidence? And yes, I would ask this of anyone who had leather lamellar, or leather armour in general. It's been discussed here before and I don't think a satisfactory answer was found. On...
by Heloise
Wed Feb 06, 2008 2:16 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23605

Do you have any pictures? I'd be interested in seeing what sort of cotton you have :D
by Heloise
Wed Feb 06, 2008 11:10 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23605

Cotton in England was relatively rare, not so much through lack of access but according to (http://des.kyhm.com/cotton) more as a reaction by the local wool industry to competition. Assuming we take a secondary source such as this to be ok(!), I think the relevant bit of the article quoted above is...
by Heloise
Tue Feb 05, 2008 11:26 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Cotton in period
Replies: 213
Views: 23605

Maybe it's not so much about discouraging cotton, but encouraging linen & wool as historically accurate garment fabrics more widely represented in the medieval context? I think this is it really - why go for things that have little evidence in terms of use in clothing (leaving aside table linen...
by Heloise
Wed Jul 04, 2007 5:45 pm
Forum: Pictures
Topic: Because he's a show off.
Replies: 75
Views: 8521

Stewart is an actual stuffy monkey but he doesn't have enough norman kit to take the field yet. I would just like to confirm that Stewart is a paid up member of Conquest, who comes to shows. He is also a stuffy monkey. With his own pyjamas. In desperate need of quality Norman kit. Fantastically cut...
by Heloise
Thu Jun 28, 2007 10:29 am
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: Making cheese
Replies: 12
Views: 3754

I make cheese as a LH thing purely by heating a bit of milk over the fire, pouring it into a bowl, adding a drop or two of vinegar (or anything acid to separate the curds out) thus showing the separation. Then it gets rinsed and strained and squished in muslin. Combine lumps with herbs. Eat. Explain...
by Heloise
Fri Jun 01, 2007 5:59 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Basic knowledge
Replies: 30
Views: 4899

I like the theory that in northen europe, it was quite common for medieval man, workers especially, to have a siesta. I think we should all do this as part of our LH. Wink If you do that dear, we'll have to play 'Symonaroo' with authentic stuff like weapons, stools, bread, and anything else we can ...
by Heloise
Thu Aug 03, 2006 7:48 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Clothing or costume ??????
Replies: 38
Views: 4821

Agree with Bil - kit is 'soft kit' or 'hard kit'. It's not costume because I'm not playing 'dressing up as a princess' (actually it was usually a witch :) ) like I did as a child. And modern clothes I normally refer to as 'home clothes' to distinguish from kit. But this is probably a reflection of b...
by Heloise
Tue Jun 06, 2006 1:10 pm
Forum: Food and Drink
Topic: Medieval bread recipes
Replies: 18
Views: 3800

Just to add, in my experience the starter can be kept loosely covered at the back of the fridge. It doesn't mind a bit of neglect so then you only need to feed it flour and water perhaps once a week. When you want to use it you just take it out a few hours early, feed it, leave it uncovered in the k...
by Heloise
Thu May 18, 2006 5:13 pm
Forum: Pictures
Topic: shameless selfpromotion/ embroidered 18th century suit
Replies: 23
Views: 4126

I hope your operation is a success :)
by Heloise
Thu May 18, 2006 9:08 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: True blue baby I love you
Replies: 9
Views: 1835

Dylon's Porcelain Blue is a very good soft blue too.
by Heloise
Thu May 18, 2006 9:06 am
Forum: Pictures
Topic: shameless selfpromotion/ embroidered 18th century suit
Replies: 23
Views: 4126

Absolutely gorgeous. As usual :lol:
by Heloise
Sun Jan 08, 2006 7:25 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: robe a la francaise 1760
Replies: 17
Views: 3251

Very impressive and deeply lovely. I am ever so jealous both of your patience and dedication, and of the person who (hopefully) paid large amounts of cash for it :)
by Heloise
Wed Nov 09, 2005 9:40 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Braiding
Replies: 45
Views: 7664

You could also try finger loop braiding - this is very easy when you get the hang of it and you can produce lengths of braid very quickly (minutes rather than hours). try http://www.thirteenthcentury.com/pages/braiding01.html for instructions. If you wanted to buy tablet weave (which is never that c...
by Heloise
Tue Nov 08, 2005 5:11 pm
Forum: 1715-1810
Topic: We are sexy, we are the 18th century!
Replies: 78
Views: 11895

I must say that although i know next to nothing about 18th century costume, being somewhat earlier, your embroidery is deeply lovely, tailordrews. I am most envious :) Costumes like those could tempt any medieval clothes tart (that'll be everyone then) to this century... PS you are very welcome to t...

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