Search found 22 matches

by ada-anne
Tue Mar 22, 2011 2:38 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: 'Templars' headdress- constructive criticism please
Replies: 17
Views: 3711

Re: 'Templars' headdress- constructive criticism please

Terminology is always unreliable, but I believe it's a too-squishy interpretation of the really extreme crespines, like Beatrice Countess of Arundel: http://www.artoftheprint.com/artistpages/stothard_charles_alfred_thomasfitzalanearlofarundelandhiscountess.htm There are several effigies and brasses ...
by ada-anne
Fri Mar 18, 2011 2:42 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: 'Templars' headdress- constructive criticism please
Replies: 17
Views: 3711

Re: 'Templars' headdress- constructive criticism please

Wow, that is really gorgeous! I remember trying to make one of these when I was a poor student, out of strip brass - it didn't work very well! Do tell, how do you get the hair inside the tubes? Personally, I hadn't heard the term "templars" before - I know them as crespinettes. When I firs...
by ada-anne
Wed Jan 27, 2010 2:22 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Sexy!
Replies: 2
Views: 1314

Re: Sexy!

You mean page 3 girl for the Ancient Sicily Advertiser 191BC (or thereabouts)? Proof that the "bodice-ripper" goes back further than you might think!
by ada-anne
Mon Aug 31, 2009 12:51 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Men's hose c1545 - evidence requested
Replies: 15
Views: 3141

I just happened to be reading Melanie Schuessler's article on children's clothing in the Lisle Letters at the same time as seeing this thread: "She hath over grown all that ever she hath": Children's Clothing in the Lisle Letters, 1533-40, in Medieval Clothing and Textiles vol.3. This anal...
by ada-anne
Thu May 28, 2009 1:40 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Shoe Care
Replies: 18
Views: 2914

If you put your heal down hard on a stone (or even a hard bit of ground), you could bruise it as there is no padding (which modern shoes have) and you're limping for the next few weeks then! Get some fleece or thin sheepskin (rummage in the offcuts bin) and make yourself a pair of woolly insoles fo...
by ada-anne
Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:07 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: crossword clue
Replies: 10
Views: 2344

No, it was one of those annoying corners where we couldn't get any of the clues. And I forgot to ask Mother to check the answers the next week.
by ada-anne
Sat Mar 21, 2009 10:35 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: crossword clue
Replies: 10
Views: 2344

Kirtle was my best guess, but it's a bizarre description!
by ada-anne
Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:58 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: crossword clue
Replies: 10
Views: 2344

I hadn't thought of that interpretation of bliaut structure. But "...to the 18th century"?
by ada-anne
Thu Mar 19, 2009 2:27 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: crossword clue
Replies: 10
Views: 2344

crossword clue

Have to try this one on you - a clue from the Telegraph crossword a couple of weeks ago. My mother said "You'll know this one", but I was completely flummoxed.

"Tunic-like garment worn over a smock, from the middle ages to the 18th century" 6 letters.

Any thoughts?
by ada-anne
Wed Mar 11, 2009 2:23 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Things that make you go '!'
Replies: 141
Views: 17491

Speaking of dirt and lack of repairs... (What makes me go "!" is people walking around in modern clothes with the hems of their trousers in tatters, becasue they can't even take up a hem - even the steward on our sleeper train at the weekend! Bring back GNER and their red coats!) We did a ...
by ada-anne
Tue Sep 02, 2008 1:04 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Advice on a Saxon style tunic
Replies: 6
Views: 1321

(Assuming you are male?) the gores need to start no lower than in line with your navel, maybe even an inch or so higher. Young chaps whose shape is straight-up-and-down often think they don't need expansion until hip-level, but putting your gores in too low will make you look a very strange shape! O...
by ada-anne
Tue Nov 20, 2007 12:17 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Literacy and Numeracy
Replies: 22
Views: 3262

There is a link between upper-class women becoming more educated and the development of Books of Hours - as more women could read, things came into being for them to read, and it was desirable to be able to read in order to follow the Hours and show your piety and virtue. St Anne (mother of the Virg...
by ada-anne
Mon Nov 12, 2007 12:24 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: New re-enactment group in Edinburgh
Replies: 32
Views: 6822

PS please don't be put off by this, the rest of the group seems fairly normal (relatively speaking anyhow)

Aw, you've put me off now! I don't want to join a group with normal people in it. :(
by ada-anne
Tue Aug 21, 2007 11:57 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Medieval sewing kit - needles?
Replies: 11
Views: 3931

"all authetic needles other than bone will get discoloured quickly if you're using them for any length of time" I just realised this weekend that the brass needle I always use is nice and shiny. The ones that are left in my sewing kit are dull and tarnished. The only time I've had a period...
by ada-anne
Wed Mar 28, 2007 11:09 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Gore-y business
Replies: 34
Views: 3441

I've always thought that if you start at one hem the gore is more likely to go wonky? What I usually do is pin and hand stitch the top 2 inches or so - it always takes several times pinning, but it's only 3 pins to keep moving - and then once that is sorted I can quickly sew or machine down the long...
by ada-anne
Tue Feb 14, 2006 12:19 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Which way do you hand sew?
Replies: 47
Views: 8250

I'm right handed and sew seams right to left. Herringbone, obviously, progresses left to right when the needle is going right to left. Hemming I'm never sure which way I want it - usually do the first few stitches and then decide I've got it the wrong way up. My mother taught needlework (although sh...
by ada-anne
Tue Jan 10, 2006 11:16 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Hurrah! From the ashes AIPON 2
Replies: 118
Views: 17097

On the bliaut, she says it's from a pattern in a book, not a very great book by the looks of it, so bliaut is probably just what the pattern was called. But she does seem to have learned more since making it, so give her credit. I really must bookmark that site.
by ada-anne
Tue Oct 04, 2005 9:52 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: English National Costume?
Replies: 29
Views: 6796

Ahhhh, I've got visions of frilly polyester blouses and badly crocheted shawls now Yikes, that hadn't occurred to me! I was thinking mill girls, or fish-wives - those blouses that cross over and pin, with no buttons, and woven shawls. Also inspired by the musical theatre group I used to be in, that...
by ada-anne
Mon Oct 03, 2005 11:12 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: English National Costume?
Replies: 29
Views: 6796

You could always do what us Welsh did, choose an historical era and wear clothes from then That's what almost everyone else has done. Most "folk" costumes around Europe, at least, are some form of historical dress with the variations particular to that area, before fashions started to travel and be...
by ada-anne
Fri Sep 30, 2005 9:48 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: What is a prix or stabbing stitch?
Replies: 5
Views: 2841

Presumably unless the material is thick enough to show whether the holes are perpendicular or slanted, there is no way of telling stab stitch from running stitch on a finished item? Having no formal training, I just change from one to the other, from hemming to oversewing etc, as I go along dependin...
by ada-anne
Sun Sep 04, 2005 10:09 am
Forum: Costumes
Topic: What was worn underneath maille legs?
Replies: 17
Views: 5306

Simon, I'd be interested to hear about it if you try a braces arrangement. What would it attach to at the back - would it go right down to the back of the chausses? I've come across attachments to a belt that go down the front and side-back, but none that go right down across your bum. I think there...
by ada-anne
Thu Aug 18, 2005 10:27 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: C12th Dress project from fleece to garment
Replies: 13
Views: 4405

Thought I'd leap in here and de-lurk, because I see a confusion about wimples developing. To Viking/Saxon/early Norman folks, a wimple is the thing you cover your head with - usually one large piece of fabric swathed around, possibly with "foundation" items underneath to fix it to. To 15th century t...

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