Search found 45 matches

by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Thu Jul 19, 2012 3:01 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Medieval Paints
Replies: 18
Views: 2436

Re: Medieval Paints

White at the time was white lead - use titanium white as a safer alternative. Some of the period pigments were lead, arsenic or mercury based, so use modern alternatives, (Or have lots of fun with CoSHH at events) The Dragonsblood is most likely from the Madeira /Canary Island species, not the one f...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Sun Jul 08, 2012 11:07 am
Forum: 1485-1603
Topic: Guinea Pigs as Tudor pets
Replies: 1
Views: 1802

Guinea Pigs as Tudor pets

Interesting article.

Would make a change from the more usual dog or ferret.

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/01/120207-guinea-pigs-europe-south-america-pets-animals/
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Wed Jul 04, 2012 9:36 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Words to historical war chants
Replies: 18
Views: 4011

Re: Words to historical war chants

Marcus Woodhouse wrote:The Agincort Carol. Not really a war chant but a hymn of praise and thanksgiving.


I agree that it was a hymn of praise and thanksgiving. However, such songs have been used for centuries to give moral to troops especially whilst marching.
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Mon Jun 25, 2012 2:36 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Words to historical war chants
Replies: 18
Views: 4011

Re: Words to historical war chants

Not exactly a battle chant, but I think it could be a marching song: Deo gracias, Anglia, Redde pro victoria. Oure king went forth to Normandy, With grace and might of chivalry, There God for him wrought mervelusly: Wherefore Englonde may call and cry. “Deo gracias”. He set a sege, the sothe to say,...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Mon Aug 17, 2009 3:57 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: lacquering leather armour (has become Archer vs Armour)
Replies: 141
Views: 11520

I would use some of my strongest archers at the begining of the battle, with lighter "flight" arrows, with needle bodkins. Medieval armies were not disciplined professionals. Arrows falling from the sky, even if not perfectly aimed would force the army to either attack or retreat. I doubt ...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Wed Aug 12, 2009 3:17 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: lacquering leather armour (has become Archer vs Armour)
Replies: 141
Views: 11520

cows are not arrow proof Neither is steel, so I'm not sure I follow that logic. Depends how thick the steel is surely, that's if we're going off on a prove it thang again a la le arsespermyfarte discussion. Also depends on the size of the arrow :twisted: Didn't Leornardo da Vinci design a giant cro...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Sat Aug 08, 2009 1:20 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: bizarre weapons and armor
Replies: 76
Views: 14847

I would tend towards the "Needle" or "Awl" interpretation. Eel spears did exist, but they had multiple flat blades, set in a row. http://images.google.com/images?client=opera&rls=en&q=eel+spear&sourceid=opera&oe=utf-8&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=M8R8SqDWEZSF-QbOq...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Fri Aug 07, 2009 11:24 am
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial.
Replies: 36
Views: 5777

Mad Monk, I have a question about gold/garnet jewellery. Is the gold matrix that holds the garnet in place soldered together with the garnet or soldered seperately then the garnet added later? Garnet can resist a lot of heat before it looks like it would do bad things and soldering the whole lot to...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Fri Aug 07, 2009 12:25 am
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial.
Replies: 36
Views: 5777

Agree that some is made from re-cycled pieces, especially the "Knot of Hercules". I'm not so sure about red glass - transparent red glass was made from colloidal gold, and is a reall bu**er to get right, it also has chemical issues. Opaque red/orange is easy and relatively common, but tra...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:21 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial.
Replies: 36
Views: 5777

duplicate post deleted
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Thu Aug 06, 2009 5:20 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial.
Replies: 36
Views: 5777

Interesting article, Hobbitstomper -- pricey though! good information re garnets, Mad Monk - do you work with them? Paul Yep, I do work with garnets - I'm trained as a gemologist, and am a member of the Soc. of Jewellery Historians, and the JPH (Jewellery, Plate and Horology) private club. I've the...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:23 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial.
Replies: 36
Views: 5777

There is still a lot of debate about where the garnets came from and how they were cut. They range in thickness from less than 0.8mm to about 1.2mm thick. Much of the debate is about if they were tablet crystals, or if they were cleaved (broken) or possibly fractured off the main stone by heat. The...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Wed Aug 05, 2009 10:38 am
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: The Sutton Hoo Ship Burial.
Replies: 36
Views: 5777

There is still a lot of debate about where the garnets came from and how they were cut. They range in thickness from less than 0.8mm to about 1.2mm thick. Much of the debate is about if they were tablet crystals, or if they were cleaved (broken) or possibly fractured off the main stone by heat. The ...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Fri Jul 17, 2009 12:23 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Medieval Pipe Smoking
Replies: 20
Views: 5538

A quarter ounce of gunpowder??? Wouldn't that be enough to blow your head off??? I'm all for getting off your face but isn't that taking it a tad literally! If you were smoking it in a firecracker, probably. :roll: On top of a herb, (not compressed inside a pipe) in a long pipe, it should just remo...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Wed Jul 15, 2009 11:22 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Medieval Pipe Smoking
Replies: 20
Views: 5538

I have seen it documented that medieval pipe smokers would fill the pipe with the herb, followed by a quarter ounce of gunpowder. The pipe would be lit using a thin wooden taper of fruitwood, which helped the flavour, apparently. Pipe smokers could be recognised by the smell of burning, and lack of ...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Fri Jul 03, 2009 9:36 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Helmet Plume Holders
Replies: 2
Views: 671

Have a word with Richard Spicer of "The Unfound Door"

He trades at Tewkesbury and many other shows selling jewellery.
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Sat Jul 26, 2008 10:54 am
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Earrings in the 15th Century
Replies: 11
Views: 1342

I would be cautious about using religious imagery for earring sources as they are not bound by normal conventions. On the whole I would say that earrings are out pre C16th and then only for nobility and gentry not for commoners. Soph :D Most of the north European paintings of earrings fron the 15th...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Fri Jul 25, 2008 11:28 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: Earrings in the 15th Century
Replies: 11
Views: 1342

There is also an earring in Van Eyck's Ghent Altarpiece, the panel of the Erythraian Sybil. ( 1432-38 ) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/24/Ghent_Altarpiece_F_-_Sybil_1.jpg One of the Queen of Sheba's attendants is also wearing an earrring in the "Catherine of Cleves Book of Hour...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Fri May 16, 2008 4:42 pm
Forum: Traders Discussion
Topic: What do you do for a living?
Replies: 21
Views: 1832

Went through "goods to declare" at Heathrow after a trip to Sumatra to avoid being pulled over, because I had a 8 ft long tube - explained it was a blowpipe, they x-rayed it and let me through. When I had put it on the plane, I had to unwrap it and explain about 5 times what it was - not e...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Tue May 06, 2008 6:36 pm
Forum: 2000BC-55BC
Topic: The Antique Greek Coins
Replies: 7
Views: 4704

And before that, small bronze copies of things like olive leafs or fish were used to represent quantities of goods - this goes back to about 1000 BC.
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Mon Apr 21, 2008 12:12 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: crystal Skulls
Replies: 13
Views: 1446

Wouldn't it be like carving marble? You have to allow for some loss as whenever you strike you're cracking the layer below where your carving from, so that layer will have to be polished off carefully to give the finished layer. Carving of quartz (rock crystal) is carried out by grinding, not chipp...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Mon Apr 21, 2008 11:57 am
Forum: General History
Topic: crystal Skulls
Replies: 13
Views: 1446

They are perhaps one of those things that will never get proven either way No. They have been comprehensively proven to be 19th century or later. If you believe otherwise, well then... I am the wif of a Nigerian general and I would like to give you £10 million, but pleasae first send me the £10, 00...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Mon Apr 21, 2008 12:22 am
Forum: General History
Topic: crystal Skulls
Replies: 13
Views: 1446

Agree 100% with Guthrie. Not a single one of the "crystal skulls" has been proved to be from before Columbus. The closest are a few which were made from pre-columbian beads, so the drill hole is older, but the carving was Victorian period. This article from "Archeology Magazine" ...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Tue Apr 15, 2008 1:29 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Medieval abrasives
Replies: 17
Views: 1906

Shavegrass (and bamboo) have a type of opal (the gemstone) in their fibres.

This is what you get the abrasive action from.

Traditionally in Burma and China, Jade was polished against bamboo.
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Sun Mar 30, 2008 1:17 pm
Forum: Traders Discussion
Topic: Only a few Spaces left guys!!
Replies: 2
Views: 458

It would help if you said what event :lol:
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Tue Feb 26, 2008 12:34 pm
Forum: 410-1100
Topic: New interpretation of how Rus-vikings dressed
Replies: 20
Views: 2676

New interpretation of how Rus-vikings dressed

I came across this article, and thought it might be of interest to some.

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2008-02/uu-vdn022508.php
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Thu Jan 17, 2008 9:35 pm
Forum: 1100-1500
Topic: GOTHIC BUILDINGS 1000-1500
Replies: 38
Views: 3672

Malbork castle (Marienburg) in Poland. Virtual tour (you need a high speed connection for this) http://acpanodesign.qupis.com/ Photos of Castle and Amber museum http://public.fotki.com/gadasyuk/traveling/poland/malbork/ Heavily re-built after WWII, because it was defended by fanatical Nazis - it hel...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Fri Jan 04, 2008 2:32 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Vamplates
Replies: 6
Views: 826

There are a number of existing vamplates which are gilded steel. http://www.karlofgermany.com/vamplate.htm Brass would be between 2 and 3 times the weight for the equivalent strength of steel. If someone was rich enough to afford jousting, they would be more likely to have gilded steel. I would susp...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Sat Dec 29, 2007 1:54 pm
Forum: General History
Topic: Pike at Flodden Field 1513
Replies: 15
Views: 1984

It might also be worth checking the length of a "foot" from the period. The Scottish "foot" was slightly longer than an English "foot", (minor difference) and some of the variation in described lengths could be due to local variations in length units. Taken from wikiped...
by Mad Monk of Mitcham
Sat Dec 15, 2007 5:35 pm
Forum: Costumes
Topic: Costume Jewellery - Shaped gemstone pendants?
Replies: 4
Views: 1100

If the stones you have are the ones I think they are, the design is very modern. Many Roman stones would have still been re-used at this period. The thing to remember, is that the stones would be much more valuable than the metal, which is why glass was so often used. They would be a relatively high...

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